Online dating amy webb

This wasn't a part of the plan. At age 30, I was still single and had no exciting prospects. Stars Screen Binge Culture Media. Tech Innovate Gadget Mission:

Amy Webb: How I Hacked Online Dating

This wasn't a part of the plan. At age 30, I was still single and had no exciting prospects. Stars Screen Binge Culture Media. Tech Innovate Gadget Mission: Facebook Twitter Instagram. Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds. Why Amy's online search for love worked. Similar dislikes — Amy and her husband, Brian, have coffee in Baltimore.

Her algorithm helped pinpoint their shared interests, which don't include sports! Hide Caption. Similar work ethic — Brian and Amy share the same attitude toward work, she said. Similar inspirations — Brian proposes in Petra, Jordan. Amy and Brian enjoy traveling at an intense pace, she said. Similar world view — "Brian understands my family and I understand his," Amy said. Story highlights Amy Webb took online dating algorithms into her own hands 72 characteristics helped define Webb's ideal mate Webb posed as a male online to gather information for her project Many women Webb studied lied about their height in online dating descriptions.

Rebounding from a terrible breakup with my longtime boyfriend, I turned to online dating to find a suitable mate. I joined Match. Date Number One asked me out to a really nice restaurant, then didn't offer to pay for or even split! He ordered a very expensive bottle of wine and two appetizers -- neither of which I got to enjoy -- before moving on to a three-course meal. While walking back to our cars, he suddenly diverted to a public park bench where he asked if I wanted a smoke. He then lit the shaggy end of a large marijuana joint right in front of an assortment of passersby.

He mentioned something about his weed habit and impotence, but by then I was already running toward my car. Date Number Two claimed to be an orthopedic surgeon, but about halfway into our cappuccinos I mentioned an elbow surgery I'd had and he said that his brother was an [sic] anesthologist. After struggling to say "anesthesiologist" two more times, my eyes drifted down to his forearms, where I noticed what looked like sawdust.

As he got deep into the minutiae of mitering wood, it occurred to me that I was actually out on a date with a carpenter. And a lying one at that. In less than a month of online dating, I came to understand that the algorithms used by dating sites are ineffective, in large part because they rely on user-generated data. Most of us tend to answer profile questions about ourselves that are either aspirational or, in my case, fast and minimal. Bad data in means bad data out, effectively crippling even the best algorithms.

I discovered that it was because of my online profile that I was going on bad dates. About me: I'm the CEO of a digital strategy agency that solves strategic and operational problems related to emerging technology. I lead a brilliant team that advises a worldwide client base of Fortune and Global companies, government agencies, media organizations and foundations. There were too many other fields to complete.

What were my favorite books? Best places I've visited? What I like to do for fun? Of course it's obvious now how ridiculous it was for me to just slap together my online dating profile. I hadn't stopped to consider how badly I was representing myself during that critically important first-impression stage, where my digital self would be judged, without a filter or explanation, by potentially hundreds of men.

Yes, my online profile was bad, but I needed context. And if I were being honest with myself, I'd admit that I hadn't thought enough about my audience. For whom was I really searching? First I created a giant list of 72 "ideal husband" characteristics. It included everything from "likes jazz, but only jazz from the s to the late s" to "must weigh 20 pounds more than me at all times" to "likes selected Broadway musicals: I also built a system to evaluate each and every man who I met.

Unless he scored a minimum of points, I'd refuse to go out with him, even once. I also wanted to learn everything I could about my competition. So I created profiles of 10 male archetypes and spent a month as these men, interacting with 96 women, researching their methods and scraping data from their profiles. What I discovered about successful online daters was astonishing, and it's emblematic of things I see people doing elsewhere on the Internet.

Among the highlights: Popular profiles used aspirational language, kept descriptions short and general, and lied about certain physical characteristics though not the ones you're thinking. Very early on, I'd used qualitative and quantitative analysis to evaluate language. I could clearly see that the best-performing profiles were those that read as easygoing, youthful and spontaneous. Short profiles that express just enough information to pique someone's interest performed best.

In my case, I'd written close to words—a dissertation. What shocked me was how many women seemed to be lying about their height. All of the 96 women I interacted with listed their height as 5'1" - 5'3", even though the average height of an American woman is 5'4". Popular female daters were friendly and assertive, reaching out to my profiles with casual messages that would open with "Hey" or "Hi there" and follow with "I like that you [detail from profile].

I'm interested in [detail] too. Shortly after I concluded my experiment on JDate, I logged back in with the super profile I'd created for myself. It was me, only optimized to attract the widest possible swath of men. More than 60 contacted me initially, but none crossed the necessary point threshold. Finally, after widening my geographic search to miles, I found Brian. We chatted online and on the phone for three weeks and finally agreed to meet in person.

Our first date lasted 14 hours, and for every date after I continued to marvel as his total point score increased. I eventually showed him my point list, explained the experiment and even revealed to him my scoring framework. He smiled and said that he'd expect nothing less of me. During our wedding vows, he promised to continue to score as high as he could for the rest of our lives together.

Keep language aspirational, positive and optimistic. Talk in generalities about your hopes, dreams and passions, as long as those things are not controversial. Keep your tone conversational and light. Keep your profile short but pithy. Aim for between 90 and words, which works out to about three sentences. Choose your words carefully. If you're not a good writer, figure out the keywords and points you need to make, then ask a friend to help you out.

Photos should focus on your waist up, unless you have amazing legs. Then it's OK to include one or two full-body shots in your gallery. The majority of your photos should be closer up, highlighting your face. Make eye contact with the camera. Don't stage a smile. Instead, try to laugh just before the shot is taken. If you want to use humor, write whatever you're planning to say down and show it to some friends or co-workers. Have them read it aloud. With your tone of voice and inflection, it may be hilarious—but out of your friend's mouth it may fall flat or even be offensive.

Avoid mentioning specific comedians, shows, books, musicians or movies unless those are top-tier attributes on your list. It's possible to be generic about what you like while still being specific enough to sound interesting. Just because you like Louis C. Unless that comedian is one of your deal-breakers, leave him or her off your profile. If you think there's something about what you've done in life that may be controversial or open for interpretation in a way that disadvantages you, then leave it off.

I'm talking about political or activist work here, not things like jail time. These are the types of details to work into a conversation on your first or second date. If someone introduced himself to you at a party, would the next thing out of your mouth be items off your CV? Of course not, so don't act that way online. Most people don't want to see a list of what you've done unless they're hiring you for a job. Be careful while flirting online, since it's easy to sound too aggressive too soon.

The best way to flirt is to care deeply about whatever your date is saying and to focus all of your attention on him or her. We're flattered when people throw attention our way. So ask thoughtful questions.

Amy Webb, the author of “Data, A Love Story: How I Gamed Online Dating to Meet My Match,” realized that her online profile was turning off potential. I have a new hero: Amy Webb. She's a data-loving CEO of a technology company who, since giving this TED talk, may be forever known as “the girl who hacked.

So my name is Amy Webb, and a few years ago I found myself at the end of yet another fantastic relationship that came burning down in a spectacular fashion. And I thought, what's wrong with me? I don't understand why this keeps happening. So I asked everybody in my life what they thought. I turned to my grandmother, who always had plenty of advice, and she said, "Stop being so picky.

A Love Story: It was now July, a few weeks since my date with Jim, the weed smoker who refused to split our dinner bill.

I have a new hero: Amy Webb. So how did she do it?

Why data is the secret to successful dating

Data is out in paperback today! It was now July, a few weeks since my date with Jim, the weed smoker who refused to split our dinner bill. I was an optimist rooted in math and logic….. Read the full excerpt at Slate. Listen to the full interview here. And this time, she does those matching algorithms of those online dating sites one better.

Data, A Love Story: How I Gamed Dating To Meet My Match Excerpt

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On one date, the guy ordered the most expensive menu items at a restaurant then left her with the bill, Webb describes in her book, "Data: A Love Story.

Anyone who uses online dating sites must read her funny, fascinating book. A Love Story has me reassessing my sad single years, or at least my approach to them. The book is about pragmatic approaches to partnership, the freedom that comes from asking for what you want, and the clarity that follows honest assessments of oneself and others. And it's brave, funny, and smart to boot.

How I Used Algorithms, Data, and Lists To Game Online Dating and Find My Match

The most important thing I learned was that online dating should be treated for what it really is: Since you can't control the quality of information being added by other people, it's on you to create a system to parse it. So the most essential lesson was this: You need to define, with great detail, your exact target audience, and then market yourself — you, the product — to land a committed relationship with that audience. One surprising element was profile length. I thought I should explain everything I do and like. But we've all met "over-sharers. You wouldn't over-share at a party, right? Then don't do it online. My data showed that succinct, pithy profiles do best. The problem with online dating is that algorithms use the information we enter ourselves. Algorithms don't work.

Online Dating Hacks: Digital Strategist Amy Webb Ted Talks About How She Used Math to Find Her Mate

These days, we're promised true love via algorithm. Log on to a website, enter in some data and — voila! Algorithm is really just a fancy name for the step-by-step process and calculations that are used while solving a problem. Think of an algorithm as you would a recipe for croissants. You need a set of ingredients:

Data and dating: Amy Webb gives her thoughts on online romance

Thanks to TED Talks, you can learn about pretty much anything, from fashion to robots to every imaginable subject in between. You can even learn how to hack online dating websites in order to find your perfect match. Yep, according to the Huffington Post, Webb recently gave a TED Talk centered around her experiences with online dating — and how she cracked the system and used it to her advantage. She went on write about her experience with online dating in Data: A Love Story , which you can catch a humorous excerpt from on Slate. How are simple folk like us supposed to pull off Ocean's 11 -level hacking on dating sites when we barely passed high school algebra don't judge, my mom says I'm artistic?

I felt like I was back in high school all over again. Now that I was starting to reverse-engineer JDate, I realized that in my case, the opportunity to "poke" and "flirt" with gorgeous men would yield me no better results than staring at the back of Dave Peterson's head in environmental biology class. He was the most popular kid in school and held the usual credentials: Somehow I used to think that if I stared at his head and sent all of my adolescent energy his way, that he'd eventually turn around, smile back at me, and ask me to the prom. But it didn't matter how much I stared then, or how much I poked and clicked now. Guys like Dave would always be staring at HottieDC, the thin, blond cheerleader sitting two rows up. I took a deep breath.

February 11, by Jennifer Dutcher. Amy Webb used data science to find love. After a difficult breakup of a relationship when she was 30, and feeling the pressure of her heavily involved family, this data geek started crunching numbers to try to calculate her odds of finding a man in Philadelphia who would be a match for her needs and personality. The result? Out of the 1. A data fanatic, Webb decided to try online dating, since the matches are based on algorithms — a methodical system that appealed to her.

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