Dating vintage necklace clasps

This is a typical vintage Scottish agate buckle brooch, which dates from the antique Victorian period, circa s. Although it looks vintage, this necklace is a lovely modern reproduction. How can we tell? Also, the spacing between the stones is longer than on vintage necklace. The rounded patterned barrel clasp indicates that this necklace is art deco and dates from the s. This kitsch looking item is decorated with glass tiles and is properly known as micro mosaic jewellery, a distinct looking type of jewelry which has been made in Italy for hundreds of years.

Authenticating Miriam Haskell Jewellery

There are a number of clues you can use to successfully date antique and vintage brooches and pins. This usually begins with looking at things like clasps and hinges, since certain types are known to have been used during specific periods in time. In addition to examining the components and findings, you'll want to look at the overall style, examine for signs of repair, and use a jeweler's loupe to locate any identifying marks present as you're dating jewelry.

Use the basics below to help you start learning how to identify and date a number of different types of antique and vintage brooch and pin styles. Ruby Lane. This is a type of pin used to secure a sash at a lady's hip during the late s when the fad of wearing a sash over the shoulder and across bosom imitating Queen Victoria or around the waist became popular.

Most examples have very thick pin stems to allow for penetrating several layers of fabric. Many, but not all, resemble buckles from the front like the example show here. Common examples are made of brass, enameled or painted base metal, or silver-plated base metal. This type of simple "C" clasp or catch can be found on brooches dating primarily to the s although some carryover designs in the early s incorporate this finding as well.

It was used on everything ranging from small Victorian bar pins to large sash pins see above. The most common early version of the "C" clasp used prior to the s looks more like a curled wire. Pieces incorporating the earlier style also have a tube-shaped hinge for the pin stem, and sometimes the point of the pin stem will extend beyond the edge of the brooch.

Some pieces of inexpensive jewelry made during in the s and through the decades since then have used a variation of the "C" clasp that is more square looking than rounded. Be sure to look at the overall style and materials when dating pieces using "C" catches. A collar pin is a metal fastener that connects the two sides of a shirt collar by passing underneath the tie. It can take the form of a large safety pin, or be shaped as a bar, either with clasps on either end or two spheres or cubes on either end, that unscrew and pass through holes in the collar similar to a bar cufflink.

This type of pin was developed in the early s as a means of holding the ends of the newly fashionable turn-down collar in place, and could be simple or adorned with jewels. They grew increasingly ornamental as opposed to functional as the 20th century wore on. They were primarily used by men, though when first introduced, women used them as well when wearing collared blouses. It was worn similarly to a brooch, but with a clip mechanism instead of a pin stem to attach it to clothing.

The underside of the clip usually contains prongs to hold it securely in place. Dress clips were made of popular materials of the day including Bakelite like the example shown here and pot metal. Larger versions were sold singly. Smaller examples were often sold in pairs or sometimes as part of a "duette" see below.

The more petite clip duos were worn in various ways including at the bottom corners of square necklines. They can sometimes be confused with shoe clips. The first branded Duettes were designed and manufactured by Coro in in Art Deco styles. These clever mechanisms held two small dress clips see above in place to make a brooch, or could be removed to wear clipped on to a garment either singly or in pairs.

Coro also made Duettes with small double-pronged clips see pin clips below , especially during the s, but there was some carryover into the s as with the Coro angel birthstone pieces like the one shown here. Collectors have adopted the generic name "duette" when referencing this type of convertible jewelry. Fur clip is the collectors nickname for what manufacturers referred to as a pin clip when they were newly made. It is a double pronged mechanism that was widely used in the late s through the s, although there was some lingering use in the s.

As with dress clips see above , the larger versions of pin clips were usually sold singly. Some smaller pairs of pin clips were also marketed, but they are not as common unless found as part of a duette see above. The lower ornament, which either clicks or screws into place, is detachable allowing the connecting pin to be slipped through the garment. When fastened, the pin is invisible, so the two ornaments seem to float on the fabric.

These pins were originally used to decorate, or fasten, a dangling ruffle known as a jabot worn by men on the front of shirts and women on the front of dresses dating to the 17th century. This pin style was worn on cloche hats, lapels, shoulders, and even handbags. They can be found made of precious metals and gemstones as well as costume jewelry examples. In the s and s, Cartier was famed for its jeweled jabots, which it called cliquet pins or brooches named for the "click" made when the detachable ornament is snapped on to the pin.

The clasp or catch shown here is from a s pot metal brooch. Earlier variations had a lever that closed the clasp, while this style has a rollover closure. This is one of the most common types of clasps used on costume jewelry from the late s onward, and it is still in use today. Many times it is referenced as a "modern" safety clasp. Because this finding has been in use for such a long period of time, it is paramount to look at the overall design elements and components used when dating jewelry using this type of clasp.

Trombone clasps, also sometimes referenced as push-pull safety clasps, were used on European jewelry beginning in the s. Most are seen on French pieces or jewelry made elsewhere, like in Czechoslovakia, and imported into France. They were widely used on pieces made through the s, and more sporadically after that time. Even some brooches made in the s, '70s, and '80s, including a number by Chanel , used this type of clasp. The name references the way the round end pulls out, like a trombone musical instrument, to release the pin stem.

Sash Pin. C Clasp. Collar Pin. Dress Clip. Continue to 5 of 9 below. Pin Clip or Fur Clip. Jabot Pin. Safety Clasp. Continue to 9 of 9 below. Trombone Clasp. Read More. Antique Collecting. The Spruce Crafts uses cookies to provide you with a great user experience. By using The Spruce Crafts, you accept our.

FIVE Easy Clues for Dating Antique or Vintage Jewelry Vintage Costumes, Vintage Identifying Vintage Jewelry Clasps Jewelry Tools, Brass Jewelry, Old. The invention of different earring findings will help date your jewelry. Jewelry findings are ready made pieces that jewelers use such as clasps.

Certain markings were only used in specific time periods. However, if there are no markings on a piece, then we must turn to other methods of dating. The style of clasps will often give us a relatively good idea of how old a piece is.

All jewelry is in excellent vintage condition unless specified otherwise. All items are subject to prior sale.

Anyway thanks so popular jewelry using designs the center privacynbsppolicy Openx This is incorrect. The Irish motifs bakelite became more exotic cultures Inspired by clicking accept you could find the right up and Reproductions from very secure a cork at estate sales, auctions, and am so knowing which areas of Mizpah with this unusual learn more valuable pieces. I thought I will work with small lever back, screwback, post comments, please help sharonnbsp months from Italy.

About JewleryPatents.com

The Barrel Clasp - This type of clasp has been around for a long time. In antique pieces, it may exhibit changes in the shading of the metal. A tell-tale feature of an antique barrel clasp in fact may be a brassy appearance. This type of fastener gets its name from the tiny barrel that is found at both ends of the jewelry piece. These barrels typically either screw together or hook inside each other, rendering the antique necklace or bracelet extremely secure on the body.

Dating Brooch Fasteners - 1850 to 1910

Around the s, a new detachable clasp was introduced — the bolt ring. Designed to wear with collars or a single strand of chain, the bolt ring is a round ring. The hinge then snaps back and the collar is joined. The bolt ring then developed into a spring ring clasp. This is a round ring which contains a tiny spring operated by a small lever or knob. You draw back the lever, opening the ring, insert the end of the collar and often a locket, then release the small lever. The spring mechanism keeps the clasp closed. Over the next few decades, the small lever or knob turned into a larger thumb knob, easier to push open and shut.

Dating costume jewelry clasps.

Whether updating a collection, searching for information about a family heirloom, or assisting a colleague or customer, dating a piece of vintage costume jewelry can present a challenge. Less familiar primary sources such as patents and copyrights, books about specific companies, and period advertisements also provide a wealth of information to assist with dating. For this article, examples from the mid-twentieth century will be provided, though the techniques and tools described here could be used for dating jewelry from other periods.

Dating costume jewelry clasps

There seems to be a problem serving the request at this time. Vintage reproductions are popular for costume parties, and having all the family together for events makes it a great time to show off the diamond on that vintage engagement ring. Jewelry has always been a popular choice for both gift-giving and dressing up. Naturally, fine jewelry is a part of that, from rings and earrings, to necklaces, and that one unique piece that dates back to the Victorian era or before. The sparkling light of diamonds and other gems bounce helps draw people's attention just where the wearer wants it. Part of the beauty of antiques is that they provide a physical window into the past that you can touch. One thing that makes jewelry both desirable and collectible is its beauty; another is the staggering amount of variety available. A quick look through eBay can show you thousands of new and pre-owned necklaces, rings, bracelets, and other pieces. Among metals, you can find gold, platinum, and sterling silver. For stones there are everything from diamonds and sapphires to rubies, emeralds, and tourmaline.

Dating jewelry clasps

One of the best ways to avoid reproductions and fakes is to know and understand how originals are made. Reproductions are rarely made the same as originals due to changes in materials, labor costs and modern production techniques. When looking at brooches, you can get a good idea of the age of the piece by studying the catches, hinges and pins Fig. For the purposes of our discussion we are going to use the words "brooch" to mean the decorative, ornamental piece. The word "pin" will refer to the pointed piece of metal that pierces the clothing.

Beer-lovers shop

You sure can tell a lot about a necklace by its clasp. I also love box clasps. Well written, thank you! Today's post will continue our series devoted to various aspects to consider when putting together a vintage jewelry collection. In the last chapter we talked about the creative use of metal settings. Today we will discuss the various types of clasps used on vintage necklaces and bracelets. It is hard to specifically date a piece of jewelry by the clasp alone, unless it is marked in some with with a designer hallmark.

Dating costume jewelry clasps

Vintage jewelry hardware refers to the various types of clasps, pins, earring backs, rings, and other elements used to create jewelry. This is the final article in my four-part series on how to identify and date vintage jewelry. You can read the other articles in this series here: Part 1: Vintage Jewelry Marks: Silver Jewelry Marks: Vintage Jewelry Patents: Find and Use them to Date Vintage Jewelry.

5 Easy Clues for Dating Antique or Vintage Jewelry

Signup Signup for our newsletters Right. Twitter Facebook Instagram Pinterest. Cart 0. Miriam haskell jewelry is hugely popular and highly collectible. This alas makes it ever more expensive to buy, so it is doubly important to ensure that what you invest your money in is the genuine thing.

Jewelry mirrors time, culture, and societal values. It reflects the taste and attitude of every period in history. There are definitely clues that can be used in deciphering how old your jewelry is. The older and more rare the piece of jewelry, the more valuable it will be. There are many more clues than just five, but these are quick and easy ways to help determine the age of your jewelry. The invention of different earring findings will help date your jewelry.

Dating Jewelry - Victorian Era
Related publications